How Physicians Can Build Their Digital Brand to Enhance a Job Search

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If there is one thing that Americans have learned in the last six months, it is that ‘business as usual’ no longer exists. That can also be said about physicians who are looking for a new career opportunity. Obviously, not every aspect of a physician job search has changed, and the high demand for physicians isn’t going to resolve itself anytime soon. But with some healthcare organizations still hitting the pause button on their recruitment efforts due to reduced patient volumes, estimates show there are up to 25% fewer searches.

To stand out in a more competitive job market, building an authentic, digital brand that gets noticed by medical groups and hospitals will help you secure an on-site physician interview. Hiring organizations are also digging deeper into a candidate’s online presence to make sure any job offers made are to physicians who are a strong fit professionally and culturally.

Keep in mind that a digital brand extends further than how you market yourself to employers, it also includes how colleagues, industry partners and patients perceive you. When defining who you are as a doctor, it is important to assess how your unique attributes, skills, ambitions and values could appeal to or deter those involved in the hiring decision.

Before you begin working on your digital brand, it is important to spend some time in self-reflection. Naturally, part of your brand is your specialty, but taking the time to understand yourself (and what is important to you) facilitates the development of an authentic and relatable brand. Here are a few things you should ask yourself to best define and understand your own professional brand.

  • What are your biggest passions?
  • In which skills or environments do you excel?
  • What are your personal and professional values?
  •  What do you want to achieve? By when? With whom?

Now, let’s review two paths you can take to communicate your brand digitally.

Boost Your Digital Footprint

Make it easy for potential employers to find you online by engaging with social media. While some physicians haven’t made the leap to building a social network, it’s really just a digital version of networking – an activity in which we all need to undertake to advance our careers. Follow these simple tips:

  • Regularly review your online profiles. It sounds simple, but many physicians neglect to simply Google themselves. Clean up any outdated profiles and address any unfavorable reviews.
  • Check your privacy settings on personal social media accounts. Not every picture, meme or thought you post needs to be available to the entire world. Ask yourself if you would want your patients to see what you’re posting?
  • Don’t rely on a single source for your online professional presence. Yes, more than 700,000 physicians are using Doximity, and you are probably one of them. It is a great tool for getting referrals and for promoting your brand. LinkedIn has grown in influence beyond just healthcare administrators. More physicians are using the platform to engage with professionals from a variety of industries.
  • Stay engaged on the social media sites. Write a blog article, share a post that illustrates something of interest for you, and follow thought leaders. It is essential to stay active, so potential employers who visit your profile don’t find it covered in virtual cobwebs.

Seek Publication in a Medical Journal

While it requires some work, one of the ways a physician can build a digital brand and an enhanced reputation is to seek publication in a medical journal. If you successfully publish a paper in a respected venue, you are firmly establishing yourself as a thought leader.

However, the digital age we are living in makes it even more important to avoid the common pitfalls. Here are a few tips from the National Institute of Health for those interested in medical writing.

  • Focus on originality. Being original is a two-pronged requirement. The first is to find a subject that is compelling and hasn’t been covered excessively. While this can take some time, the result will be an article that sparks the attention of your reader. The second component of originality is to avoid plagiarizing the thoughts and research of others.
  • Find an innovative approach. It is nearly impossible to craft a compelling paper if you are revisiting a medical challenge from the same angle as five previous authors. That’s not to say that an old problem should always be off-limits, but tackle it with a new treatment approach.
  • Stick to the accepted format. Scientific and medical papers are formal in nature, and deviating from the accepted organizational approach will limit your ability to achieve publication. Another aspect of your work that should never be overlooked is having enough data to back up your conclusions. Once your paper is exposed to the online world, you can count on digital detectives and keyboard warriors trying to find cracks in your theory.
  • Persistence usually wins. Your first attempt at publication may fail. At least that is the approach you should take because most medical journals will not accept a paper the first time it is submitted. Not succumbing to discouragement and redoubling your efforts to fine-tune a paper you believe in will be key to publication success.

A great deal of uncertainty remains in the healthcare industry. The professionals at Jackson Physician Search have been at the forefront of physician recruitment and placement for many years and have the established relationships and experience to help you find the best opportunity. Contact our recruitment team today and learn how we can make a difference in your physician job search. Or, search our open jobs and apply right away at jobs.jacksonphysiciansearch.com.

 

AAPPR Physician Recruitment Search Success Survey

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Rural Practice Opportunities Offer Undeniable Benefits for New Physicians and Those Soon-to-be-Retiring

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The pandemic has led many physicians to question the next chapter in their lives, and how they’d like to spend it. For some, it appears an early departure towards partial (or even full) retirement is the answer, while others are seeking a better balance between work and life. At Jackson Physician Search, we’re seeing evidence of both – physicians are increasingly exploring new job opportunities.

In a recent MGMA webinar, Jackson Physician Search President Tony Stajduhar spoke about the market dynamics of healthcare recruitment by stating that up to 50,000 physicians were expected to accept new positions in 2020. Considering the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, much of this movement is predicted during the second half of the year.

Now, as the country continues to reopen, many hospitals and medical groups are resuming onsite interviews, opening the door for physicians to accept coveted new roles. With physicians reporting feelings of increased stress and burnout from the unrelenting COVID-19 patient volumes found in the hotspots, many doctors who previously would have gravitated for an urban position are considering rural practice opportunities.

Moving to the country – somewhere out in the middle of nowhere – isn’t something that many physicians envision for themselves or their families, but most rural communities aren’t as remote as you’d imagine. According to the census bureau, a rural area is defined as any population, housing, or territory that is not located in an urban center. In reality, that includes most of America.

Residents and Fellows as well as Physicians Transitioning to Partial Retirement May Find Rural Opportunities Particularly Enticing.

While nearly 20 percent of Americans live in rural areas, only about 10 percent of physicians are living and working in the same communities. Historically, rural healthcare facilities have had difficulty competing with their urban counterparts when filling physician vacancies, so they’ve adapted by offering several benefits often not as readily available to newly practicing physicians and those who are nearing the end of their careers. Let’s review, so you can decide if the next chapter of your life includes a relocation.

  • Higher Compensation. Tony Stajduhar said in a NEJM article that recent placement data showed an additional 5 to 10 percent in starting salaries in rural opportunities compared to urban for some specialties. Higher signing bonuses may be available, too. For new physicians who are facing large student loan debts, a higher starting salary can make a big difference in building the life they envision.
  • Lower Cost of Living. Rural locations often feature a lower cost of living, which is attractive for most anyone, but particularly so for young physicians buying their first home or retiring ones moving to their forever home. It also goes without saying that for those physicians seeking part-time employment as they transition to full retirement, the cost of living savings could be put to good use traveling or pursuing other hobbies.
  • Better Work and Life Balance. Flexible schedules, or more control over it, are often a perk available to physicians who choose a rural setting. For younger physicians who are just starting a family, this means you’re able to be more present. Furthermore, some specialties aren’t needed on a full-time basis in every community, so this paves the way for an experienced physician to be paid very well for part-time work. And for those who live in cities like Atlanta, Los Angeles or New York, or any others known for the worst commutes, moving to a smaller community gives you back hours in your day.
  • Open Lines of Communication with the CEO. In a smaller or rural practice setting, there is little to no bureaucracy to navigate. Physicians often have a direct line to the CEO, meaning that decisions get made faster, changes can be made to workflows more quickly, and dialogue is encouraged.
  • Physicians are Key Stakeholders. When was the last time you were directly involved in deciding how your organization was managed? In a smaller community setting, you will find that your ideas are welcome, and you are part of a collaborative team all working with the same goals in mind. In a recent Jackson Physician Search survey, 43% of physician respondents cited more autonomy as an important attribute in their careers.
  • Workplace Culture. In recent years, physicians have placed a greater emphasis on culture, values, and fit when considering new job opportunities. In a rural setting, you have a great deal of influence on the overall workplace culture, which is often appealing to early and late careerists who want to make their mark or leave a legacy, respectively.
  • Community Involvement. While being an active member of the community isn’t for everyone, when you are a physician practicing medicine in a smaller practice setting, you are going to have the opportunity to be as involved as you want. Instantly having the respect of the community may even move you to step out of your comfort zone and act on your newly acquired “pillar of the community” status. Not surprisingly, in the aforementioned survey, physicians who were practicing in rural communities ranked their top reason for choosing to practice there as community culture.

COVID-19 continues to challenge us all, and it’s leading some physicians to look for new ways to manage such a high-stress career. It’s always wise to take time and evaluate career options, but that’s true now more than ever.  If you have always been focused on staying within large, urban, and metropolitan hospitals and health systems, consider if the alternative is best for you. Smaller communities throughout the U.S. are medically underserved, and physicians who choose to practice there are making a difference in countless ways. Now just might be the perfect time for you to join them.

If you are actively considering your career options, or if you just want to see what types of opportunities are out there, contact the professional physician recruiters at Jackson Physician Search. Our team is comprised of experienced healthcare industry professionals who have nationwide contacts and the reach to help you secure your perfect practice setting.

 

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Match Day 2020: Amid Uncertainty, Still a Time for Celebration

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Match Day is a time for celebration at the 155 medical schools in the United States, as it marks the day residency and fellowship training positions are announced.  Unfortunately, due to concerns about the spread of Covid-19, some of the planned activities are being canceled or scaled back to reduce the size of gatherings.  Covid-19 concerns aside, nothing should dampen the overall celebratory feelings of the more than 44,000 fourth-year medical students who are anxiously awaiting their match results. After four years of late nights, long days, and hard work, medical students across the nation can finally see the sun rising on their future careers.  In 2019, of the 44,000 registrants, more than 35,000 were matched to one of their choices.

While the majority of Match Day applicants receive a position to continue their medical training, there is a small percentage that does not get placed in one of the residency or training slots.  How does that happen and what can be done?  It’s important to understand the challenges the candidates you’ll be recruiting one day face.  Let’s answer some questions medical students who are about to graduate — and who will eventually become the next generation of physicians — might have about Match Day and beyond.

Why is there a shortage of residency slots?

One of the major contributing factors directly relates to an Act of Congress.  In 1997, as part of a Balanced Budget Act, Congress legislatively capped the number of residency training slots to be funded through Medicare.  At the time, it helped to reduce the Medicare budget.  Still, today’s physician shortage highlights the need for Congress to act with a greater sense of urgency.  In 2016, 2017, and again in 2019, legislation was brought to the floor of both Houses of Congress to address the physician shortage through an expansion of residency slots.  In each case, the bill stalled.

What’s next for those who don’t receive a match?

It doesn’t mean the end of their medical career, residency slots are still available.  The National Resident Matching Program®, in association with the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates, offer a joint Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP).  This program allows applicants who didn’t match to a program of their choice to apply to residency positions that went unfilled after Match Day.  To be eligible for SOAP, applicants must be registered for the Main Residency Match.  Then, they must be eligible to enter graduate medical education on July 1, 2020, and be unmatched or partially matched on Monday of Match Week.

Not matching is just a temporary setback. Here’s what else can be done.

Medical school graduates have worked hard to get to this point and should know that not matching is only a temporary setback.  The worst course of action would be to give up.  There are steps that can be taken if match day and SOAP doesn’t work out.  Clinical Work is an option.  Typically, they won’t be able to participate in the direct care of patients, but that doesn’t mean they have to keep their clinical skills on the shelf for a year.  One of the best ways graduates can stay close to the action and be involved is to work as a scribe for a medical practice.  Practicing physicians will be grateful for any opportunity that frees them up to focus more on patient care and less on administrative activities.

Keeping graduates involved in the healthcare industry and on the path to becoming a physician is crucial.  It is also beneficial for healthcare administrators to utilize educated and motivated individuals.  Encourage graduates to focus on improving their skills, gaining clinical experience to enhance their resume, and help them get set up for a successful Match Day 2021.

Residency is a pivotal point on the path to becoming a physician and our best option for catching up with the demand for physicians. At Jackson Physician Search we work to support the hospitals and health systems across the nation that are training the next generation of physicians. If you need help recruiting residents or recruiting physician leaders to train residents, reach out to Jackson Physician Search today.

 

What to Know When Recruiting Residents - Medscape Takeaways

What to Know When Recruiting Residents – Medscape Takeaways

Life as a resident is challenging for many reasons. Long hours and low pay, it’s a balancing act of simultaneously being learners and medical care providers. 

Why Match Day Matters

5 Reasons Why Match Day Matters

Amid the fanfare of balloons, school mascots, cheers and tears, thousands of medical school students and graduates experienced life-changing news on Match Day 2018.

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

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How a Recruiter Can Help You Find Your Best Opportunity

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Dr. E is a young, family medicine practitioner. She did her undergrad in Alabama and her medical degree in Washington, DC.  Dr. E was completing her Family Medicine Residency at a large medical center in North Carolina, but was in the process of starting her search for outpatient primary care openings within driving distance of her family who lived in and around Washington, DC.

Searching for the right position on her own, she had received a few offers from large medical systems but had been hesitant to accept any of them. She was finding that the offers were requiring her to commit to five years, in exchange for a $100,000 in student loan assistance.  Then, Dr. E responded to an opportunity for a Primary Care provider search being promoted by Jackson Physician Search, Director of Recruitment, Sally Ann Patton.  The opportunity was located in Maryland and within driving distance of the nation’s capital.  Dr. E and Sally Ann immediately developed a great rapport. Through their initial conversations, Sally Ann quickly understood Dr. E’s concerns about the type of setting she was looking for, her student loan concerns, and she walked her through what a reasonable compensation package might look like without strings attached. She explained what Dr. E should be looking for to provide quality of life, a manageable caseload, and the ability to pay down her student loans.

The opportunity that was being presented to Dr. E was with a 375-bed community hospital system that was primarily physician-led throughout their seven locations.  Dr. E met with the key leaders and was immediately taken by the physician-first approach and their focus on the doctor-patient relationship.  She found this in contrast to the larger systems that she had been interviewing at, and she appreciated the personable approach that was evident with everyone she met.  Another important relationship that played a role in what ultimately turned into a successful placement was the key role that the client’s recruitment lead played in the process.

There were clear lines of communication from the beginning, and the client was very responsive to any questions or concerns raised by Dr. E.  When the offer was presented to Dr. E, she had received a couple of other solid offers.  Because of the trust and rapport she had built with Sally Ann, she felt confident in her understanding of everything being presented to her and ultimately chose the community setting.

This scenario is not uncommon for young physicians who might be overwhelmed by the frenzied nature of searching for the right opportunity. In this case, the recruitment professional was able to establish a trust-based relationship with the physician, provide guidance about the industry and the inner workings of the contractual offer process, and even help facilitate the open communication between the client and the candidate.

If you are a physician who is ready to start exploring new opportunities to take the next step in your career, or if you are a new physician and want to better understand the industry through the guidance of an experienced physician recruitment professional, contact Jackson Physician Search today.

residents need to know

JPS Recruiters Live: 3 Things Residents Need to Know to Land a Great First Job

You can watch the recording of JPS Recruiters Live: 3 Things Residents Need to Know to Land a Great First Job on our Facebook page. (10 mins.)

Avoid the Resident’s First Job Curse

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Physician’s Choice: Employed vs. Self-employed

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Today’s physicians are in the enviable position of being in such high demand that they have any number and variety of career options to choose from. Some, in recent years, have left their private practice for hospital or large health system employment, while others have reconsidered and returned to a private setting.  Let’s take a look at the main differences between being an employed physician vs. self-employed.

Employed

  1. Financial Stability – Physicians working in a hospital or hospital-owned group do not have to worry about over-head, billing, administrative, or other private practice concerns. They know what their salary is going to be and any types of financial incentives they need to meet.
  2. Focus on Medicine – Like financial stability, employed physicians don’t have as many distractions or the responsibilities of running the practice, in addition to treating their patients. This allows their focus to remain on doing what they love to do most, practice medicine.
  3. Benefits/Insurance Coverage – Like most careers, when you are working for a larger organization, you tend to have better insurance and other benefits. Employed physicians typically have better malpractice insurance as another added benefit over private practice.
  4. Regular Schedule – In an employment setting, physicians tend to negotiate a stable work schedule, limited call duties, and paid vacation time.
  5. Academic Opportunities – In an employed setting, physicians who have the desire to pursue research and other academic opportunities can do so without losing billable hours at a private practice.

Self-employed

  1. Autonomy – As much as employed physicians have guaranteed financial security, self-employed physicians have the autonomy to practice medicine the way they deem is best. Self-employed physicians do not have administrators or other executives dictating various processes or rules that may be contrary to the physician’s practice methods.
  2. Workplace Culture – Physicians in a self-employed setting have the ability to develop the culture and values of their workplace. Whereas in an employed setting, there is little control of the culture. When you are the one making the decisions, everything that happens within the workplace is within your purview.
  3. Unlimited Income Potential – While an employed setting may provide a stable financial opportunity, there is no limit to how successful your private setting can become. As in any business, you can grow the practice into whatever you envision and with greater success comes greater reward, financial and otherwise.
  4. Work/Life Balance – When you run your own practice, you can control your work schedule. It may take time, but eventually, you can be in a position to work as many or as few hours as suits your lifestyle.
  5. Patient Relationships – In a self-employed setting, physicians have opportunities to develop relationships with their patients. Research has shown that when a doctor gets to know their patient, the result is that both are more satisfied with the level of care and overall experience.

The results of physician job satisfaction surveys show that employed physicians and self-employed physicians have similar levels of job satisfaction, with self-employed physicians just slightly more satisfied.  With that, it is safe to infer that physicians should choose the practice setting that is best aligned with their individual career goals and workplace preferences.  The employment outlook for physicians is continuing to grow at a rapid pace which means that there will continue to be plenty of opportunities to choose from regardless of the practice setting.

If you want to explore the many opportunities that are available for your physician career, contact a Jackson Physician Search recruitment professional today.

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JPS Recruiters Live: 3 Things Residents Need to Know to Land a Great First Job

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You can watch the recording of JPS Recruiters Live: 3 Things Residents Need to Know to Land a Great First Job on our Facebook page. (10 mins.)

What you need to know, before we get started, is that now is the time for you to be preparing yourself for the perfect job opportunity.

Why Now?

  • Credentialing process: On average will take 90 – 120 days
  • Phone interviews and site visits: 30 – 45 days, longer if considering multiple offers
  • Decision making: Some organizations move faster than others but prepare for a 30-day process
  • Contract review, revisions, and signing: At least 30 days

When things are going smoothly, you are looking at a process that will take six to eight months from the first date of contact.

Things to Consider

1. Play the Long Game

    • Finances – The financial aspect of your first job can be broken down into the immediate monetary value (salary, sign-on bonus, loan forgiveness, etc.), and more importantly, the long-term wealth-building opportunity of the position. Consider how the job will set you up for your future including buying a home, starting a family, living within the lifestyle of your choice, and even potentially retiring early.
    • Impact – Your career choices have an impact on every aspect of your life. Internally, you should consider what type of impact you will be able to impart on the practice and setting you choose. From an external perspective, consider the impact you can have on the community and patients you will serve. Finally, it is important to consider how your career choice impacts yourself, your family, and your future.
    • Experience – Think about how this first job is going to set you up for the future. What types of experiences will be provided for you and what do you want to gain from this job.

 

2. Embrace Your Brand

    • Millennial Pride – Yes, you are a millennial and with that comes an intrinsic set of positive attributes. As outlined in Entrepreneur Magazine, millennial employees are naturally curious, very tech-savvy, care about important social issues, and among other things, are great working in teams. Own your “millennial-ness!”
    • Promote Your Brand – Healthcare organizations have finally begun embracing the concept that finding employees who fit their culture and values are their best hires. The same applies to residents who should be looking at opportunities with organizations that match their own values. Embracing the things that you are passionate about and understanding what unique traits you bring to the table will help you make the right choice.
    • First Impressions – You’ve worked extremely hard to get to this point. Be proud of the fact that you are no longer a resident and are stepping out into a fresh start. You are skilled, prepared, and ready to make a difference – Use these attributes to present yourself during the interview process.

 

3. Utilize Available Resources

    • Don’t Go It Alone – In your profession, most of the time, you are left to your own devices when treating your patients. Sure, you have a team of nurses and others to help, but the decisions come from you. Your first job search doesn’t have to be that way. Finding an established, experienced recruitment partner, like Jackson Physician Search, can open up doors and information that you might otherwise miss.
      • Resources, Access, and Reach – A trusted career partner has resources and established connections throughout the industry that will help you access the right opportunity.
      • Experience, Data, Mentoring – Establishing a relationship with an experienced recruitment firm allows you to tap into a team that has been in the industry for decades. The right firm will provide you with quality, real-time market data showing you where the best jobs can be found.
      • Contract Negotiations – Physician compensation offers can be a tricky, complicated process. Your recruitment partner can help you navigate the hills and valleys of contract negotiations and help keep your mind at ease.
    • Blogs and Articles – There is a lot of information available to any physician who is willing to take the time to stay current on things that are happening in the employment side of the industry. You are already perusing articles through the New England Journal of Medicine, but at this stage of your career, it is also important to stay focused on the job search. Subscribing to professionally presented blog articles, like those found through Jackson Physician Search provides you access to compensation information, industry trends, data analysis, and much more. Other sites and applications we would recommend include Doximity and LinkedIn.

If you want to connect with a trusted, experienced physician recruitment firm with a national presence, contact the professionals at Jackson Physician Search today.

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What to Know When Recruiting Residents – Medscape Takeaways

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Life as a resident is challenging for many reasons. Long hours and low pay, it’s a balancing act of simultaneously being learners and medical care providers. If that wasn’t enough, they are also job-seekers. By the beginning of their second year (if not before) they will begin exploring and making decisions about where, when and how they will start practicing.

Recent surveys by Medscape hold important clues about how the competing priorities of time and money will factor into a physician’s career decisions. By better understanding the value they place on time and money, there is a better chance of presenting your practice opportunity with the right balance and fit and appealing to their needs.

Show Your Respect for Their Time

No one has figured out how to add hours to the day. And, the technology intended to make physicians more efficient has been proven to be a source of frustration for many. According to Medscape:

  • Achieving work/life balance, while dealing with the pressures and demands on their time, are the top two challenges they face in residency.
  • Eighty percent report that they don’t consistently have enough time for personal wellness and a satisfying social life.
  • Two-thirds believe that having a manageable work schedule and call hours would relieve stress.

That’s why it’s vital to demonstrate your respect for a physician’s time. Skillfully assess how well an opportunity might fit the interests of the resident and tailor the timing and content of your outreach to the greatest extent possible. The first touch during the recruitment process should be a highly relevant message that reaches them at their preferred time, using their preferred channel.

Once they show interest, don’t waste their time with a prolonged process; but don’t be pushy, either. It’s hard to strike that fine balance, but you can show them how important they are to you by following the three P’s in all communications. Be prompt, precise and personalized to their specific needs.

When phone and onsite interviews are scheduled, be sure everything is well-planned (and everyone is well-prepared) so there is no time lost due to confusion, duplication or unnecessary delays in delivering an offer.

Your candidate’s experience during the recruitment process, including their encounters with your practicing physicians and staff, will show them how well – or poorly – their time will be respected if they decide to join your organization.

Influence of Money on Physician Career Choices

Over half of the residents in Medscape’s survey expect to finish training with at least $200,000 in medical school debt. So, it is no surprise that 92 percent of residents said that potential earnings will influence their choice of specialty. But even with the pressure to pay off debt, “starting salary/compensation” ranks second, right after “work schedule/call hours,” in the list of key factors they will look for in their first job. Residents also see attributes such as “gaining clinical knowledge and experience,” “being very good at what I do” and “gratitude of patients” as the most rewarding aspects of their job, far ahead of “the potential for making good money.”

Every resident has different financial drivers and personal motivations that will influence their career decision. So, it is important to discover what those are and craft a win-win compensation package. Paying top dollar is not necessarily the answer. But being competitive is key. Just be sure you know exactly who, what or where your competition really is.

The important point is to set clear expectations about how a physician can maximize their compensation while living the life they hope for. A pathway out of educational debt or a low cost of living may be more highly valued than a top dollar salary in a high-pressure practice setting.

Explain how work RVUs, collections, quality bonuses, and other components work. Show them benchmarks and allow them to see how others like them have progressed. Provide the practice support that will free them to focus on productivity and increase their earning potential. Help them envision how well the incentives and benefits align with their needs and those of their spouse and family (if they have one).

Surveys can deliver helpful insights, but they need to be placed in the context of your situation. If you are looking for solutions to specific challenges, talk to a Jackson Physician Search recruitment expert today.

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5 Ways Match Day Impacts Healthcare

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Atlanta — Social media was flooded with #MatchDay2018 tweets, videos, and memes when the National Resident Matching Program® (NRMP) informed medical students and graduates if they will train at their top-choice program, based on best fit, interview experience, and location. As you can see, Match Day is a big moment in a medical student’s life. Now let’s look at the top 5 ways Match Day impacts healthcare:

 

  1. America is Training More – But Still Not Enough – Doctors

The record number of available first-year positions is tempered by this harsh reality: we need to train more physicians as demand continues to outstrip supply, due to the aging population and accelerating retirement of “baby boom” doctors.

 

  1. The Rising Supply of Primary Care Physicians Lags Demand

The shortage of Primary Care Physicians (PCPs), the quarterbacks of value-based care, is one of the top three worries of hospital CEOs. They are desperately needed in rural, remote and low-income communities, where they need not only better compensation, but strong support for themselves and their families.

 

  1. Medicine is a Becoming a Family Affair

More physicians are pursuing medical careers as couples. The downside? Twice the burden of educational debt on one household makes loan forgiveness an essential recruitment incentive. Retention is doubly important because you risk losing two physicians if they move away from the community.

 

  1. Location is Not the Only Thing

Location may be the top factor as residents decide where to apply. But fit and the interview experience jump ahead in their choice of programs. Ultimate success in recruiting depends more heavily on two extremely controllable factors: 1) assessing for fit and 2) delivering an excellent interview experience.

 

  1. International Medical Graduates are Important in the Physician Pipeline

The number of non-U.S. citizen International Medical Graduates (IMGs) who participated in the Match declined again. The Association of American Medical Colleges urges support for a permanent legislative solution for Dreamers to ensure academic medicine’s ability to meet increasing healthcare needs, especially for the growing medically underserved and aging populations.

 

A Proactive Recruitment Strategy is More Important than Ever

Now that you know how Match Day impacts healthcare, your next step is figuring out what you can do about it. Avoid the physician gap by developing a strategic physician recruitment plan, assessing candidate fit carefully and delivering an unparalleled interview experience that displays your rewarding workplace culture and welcoming community. See more details.

 

Jackson Physician Search is a leader in the permanent recruitment of physicians and advanced practitioners to hospitals and health systems across the U.S.

Why Match Day Matters

5 Reasons Why Match Day Matters

Amid the fanfare of balloons, school mascots, cheers and tears, thousands of medical school students and graduates experienced life-changing news on Match Day 2018. Social media was flooded with…

residency match

The Good News and Bad News of the Residency Match

First, the good news: A record number of graduating medical students get their residency match this year, with 35,969 U.S. and international medical school students and graduates vying…

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Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

5 Reasons Why Match Day Matters

By

Amid the fanfare of balloons, school mascots, cheers and tears, thousands of medical school students and graduates experienced life-changing news on Match Day 2018.Social media was flooded with #MatchDay2018 tweets, videos and memes, as medical schools across the country held ceremonies and special events to reveal residency program matches, based on medical students’ top specialty program choices. Clearly, it matters a great deal to new doctors to be accepted into their program of choice on Match Day. Here are five more reasons why Match Day matters to the future of medicine in the United States.

  1. America is Training More – But Still Not Enough – Doctors

The record number of available first-year positions in 2018 rose to 30,232, exceeding 2017 by 1,383 positions. That is encouraging news, but it’s tempered by this harsh reality: demand for physicians will continue to outstrip supply.  Healthcare organizations will continue to address shortages of up to 104,900 physicians by 2030 due to the aging population which drives both higher medical utilization and the accelerating rates of retirement among “baby boom” doctors.

  1. The Rising Supply of Primary Care Physicians Lags Demand

The shortage of Primary Care Physicians (PCPs) is one of the top three worries of hospital CEOs. As the quarterbacks of value-based care, PCPs are in high demand almost everywhere, and they are desperately needed in rural communities and other underserved areas. Even with 3,510 family medicine residency positions filled on Match Day 2018, the challenge of recruiting into rural, remote and low-income communities will grow. To attract – and keep – doctors in underserved areas, they will need better compensation, higher regard for their expertise and more effective practice resources to support work/life balance.

  1. Medicine is a Becoming a Family Affair

Couples continued to enjoy great success in matching to programs together. The 95.8 percent match rate for couples into residencies was highest on record with the NRMP. A record-high of 1,165 couples participated in the 2018 Match, 3.6 percent more than last year. Life partners provide tremendous mutual support as they pursue careers in medicine together. But, they are also doubling the burden of educational debt estimated at nearly $200,000 per person, onto one household. Loan forgiveness will be an attractive incentive for them. But, be ready to address obstacles when recruiting couples into the same practice or community, such as balancing office, call and family schedules; the variance of demand for each partner’s specialty; and the potential risk of losing both physicians if one decides to leave the community in the future.

  1. Location is Not the Only Thing

If trends hold true when the 2018 applicant survey is reported, there will be a clear difference in how they decide to apply to programs versus how they rank their top choices once they visit.  In previous years “desired geographic location” was the top factor in deciding where to apply. But fit and the interview experience jumped ahead when they ranked their choice of programs. Last year, “overall goodness of fit” was cited by 88 percent and rated 4.8 (with 5.0 being extremely important); “interview day experience” was selected by 80 percent and rated 4.6 in importance. Location came in third, cited by 75 percent and rated 4.6 in importance.

The data reinforces what experience has shown: location is an important – but uncontrollable – factor. Ultimate success in recruiting physicians depends more heavily on two extremely controllable factors: 1) assessing for fit and 2) delivering an excellent interview experience.

  1. International Medical Graduates are Important in the Physician Pipeline

The number of non-U.S. citizen International Medical Graduates (IMGs) who participated in the Match declined for the second consecutive year. To help address the physician shortage, in part, the U.S. relies on IMGs, who undergo rigorous screening by the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates as part of the J-1 visa process. Darrell G. Kirch, MD, President and CEO of the Association of American Medical Colleges, expressed concern that “uncertainty surrounding Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and physician immigration introduced new challenges into this year’s residency application process, as evidenced by a 22.7% drop in applicants from countries named in the three immigration executive actions last year.” He urges support for a permanent legislative solution for Dreamers to ensure academic medicine’s ability to meet increasing healthcare needs, especially for the growing medically underserved and aging populations.

A Proactive Recruitment Strategy is More Important than Ever

Residency trends may change from year to year. But one thing is constant: the importance of forming a strategic physician recruitment plan. Healthcare facilities can make smart hiring choices and avoid the physician gap by creating a rewarding workplace and strong organizational culture, assessing carefully for fit and delivering an unparalleled interview experience.

Working with an experienced search consultant can improve your competitive advantage by empowering you to accomplish those goals. Contact us to learn more.

 

 

Match Day

The Magic of Match Day

St. Patrick’s Day coincides with Match Day for the National Resident Matching Program® (NRMP®) 2017 Main Residency Match®. Celebrations will ensue as thousands of…

Celebrate Match Day 2018

Record Number of Med Students Celebrate Match Day 2018

For many students across the country, this is going to be a big weekend. In addition to St. Patrick’s Day festivities, over 30,000 medical students will…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

Record Number of Med Students Celebrate Match Day 2018

By

For many students across the country, this is going to be a big weekend. In addition to St. Patrick’s Day festivities, over 30,000 medical students will also celebrate Match Day 2018.

Congratulations to all the medical school graduates who just learned where they will spend the next several years training at residency programs around the United States! There were 33,167 positions filled, the most ever offered in the Match according to the National Resident Matching Program® (NRMP). This year’s 2018 Main Residency Match had 1,383 more positions than in 2017. One major contributing factor was the monumental increase of U.S. osteopathic medical school graduates. The NRMP expects the number of matches to continue to rise.

Match Day is considered by many to be more exciting than graduation day, as medical schools across the country hold special reveal events. NRMP simultaneously releases match results based on medical students’ top specialty program choices, which the applicants’ rank on best fit, interview experience and location. If an applicant did not match, they have an opportunity to obtain an unfilled position through the Match Week Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program®(SOAP®).

Your hard work and commitment as a medical student is rewarded as you take the next step in your journey toward practicing medicine. Friends, family, faculty and other trusted advisors will continue to support you throughout your residency and fellowship training experience. When you are ready to navigate the best options for your medical practice, check out our resources and reach out to experienced recruiters you can trust. We wish you the best of luck and a long career.

 

Match Day

The Magic of Match Day

St. Patrick’s Day coincides with Match Day for the National Resident Matching Program® (NRMP®) 2017 Main Residency Match®. Celebrations will ensue as…

Why Match Day Matters

5 Reasons Why Match Day Matters

Amid the fanfare of balloons, school mascots, cheers and tears, thousands of medical school students and graduates experienced life-changing news on Match Day 2018. Social media…

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